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20131028
20131105
STATION
KQED (PBS) 15
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English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the risk of concussions and how parents should weigh the tradeoffs. jeffrey brown has the story. >> brown: the n.f.l. is already playing under a new spotlight on concussions. days before the season began, the league agreed to a $765 million settlement with 4,500 former players. they'd charged that owners concealed information on the effects of repeated head injuries. that history was the focus of a pbs "frontline" investigation that aired earlier this month on the links between head injuries and brain disease. now, a new study explores the risks for athletes well before they reach their college and professional years. the report by the institute of medicine-- a non-profit, independent organization-- focuses on sports-related concussions in youth, from elementary school through adolescence. one member of the panel, dr. frederick rivara-- of the university of washington school of medicine-- pointed to a key problem: the lack of data for this age group. >> there's essentially nothing known about concussions in elementary school and middle aged kids. and that's really why there's a need for m
qualifies for bankruptcy protection. jeffrey brown gets the latest. >> brown: the day started with testimony from kevyn orr, the city's emergency manager. then for three hours, michigan governor rick snyder, who appointed orr, took the stand. it's the first time in modern state history a governor testified in court, and he faced a series of questions from the unions and retirees about whether the state and the city really did all they could do to avoid moving into bankruptcy. christy mcdonald of detroit public television was in the courtroom today, and joins me now. welcome to you. but first remind us briefly the issue in this trial is whether the city can go ahead with its bankruptcy process, right? >> right. it has to prove that it's insolvent and that's what they are seek for bankruptcy protection right now. but what the opposition wants to know is did detroit actually negotiate in good faith before they filed for bankruptcy. >> brown: all right, so today you heard from governor rick snyder, what were the lawyers opposing him arguing and what was his response? >> well, jeffrey, it was far
at the plain speech and droll wit of one of the country's foremost poets. jeffrey brown has our book conversation. the. >> brown: the trouble of poetry is that it encourages the writing of more poetry, more guppys crowding the fish tank. lines from billy collins, former poet laureate and one of the nation's best known poets. his new collection is titled "aimless love: new and selected poems "from his work of the last decade. welcome to you. >> thank you very much, jeff. >> brown: i thought i would sfrel a blur northbound this book. alice fulton writes "billy collins put the fun back in profundity." are you consciously aiming for fun? are you constantly aiming for pro fund any what are you doing? >> well, there's a lot of unconscious activity that goes on in the composition of a poem so i can't -- i can't picture myself starting out aiming to do anything, having much of an agenda. i think in writing a poem i'm making some tonal adjustments and it took me a long time to allow anything like fun into my poetry. >> brown: it did? >> well, i thought originally when i was in school and i wa
. the sox beat the st. louis cardinals last night, to take the title in six games. jeffrey brown will have more on the red sox's victory later in the program. also ahead on the "newshour": outrage over the n.s.a. tapping into servers for google and yahoo, plus spying on asia; dismantling syria's chemical weapons program; the recent wave of violence in iraq; senator susan collins on the future of the republican party and abraham lincoln's foreign policy. >> ifill: newly published information leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden is reinforcing the notion that u.s. spying spreads wide and goes deep. the latest bombshell, partly denied by the obama administration, appears in the "washington post." it says u.s. intelligence agencies have gained access to hundreds of millions of google and yahoo user accounts by secretly tapping into company data centers. late today, six top tech companies-- yahoo, google, aol, apple, microsoft and facebook-- sent a letter to congress, calling for enhanced privacy protections. barton gellman broke the story for "the washington post." welcome, bart gell
, but by far less: $4 billion over ten years. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown takes a closer look at the immediate impact of these changes and what may lie ahead. >> brown: we explore some of the changes on the table with ellen teller of the food research and action center, a not-for-profit that works with hundreds of groups around the country to eradicate hunger. and robert rector is with the heritage foundation. his work on this is considered influential with republican members in congress. welcome to both of you. ellen teller, this immediate action, cutting back assistance, allowing what was considered a temporary increase to lapse, you don't think this is a good idea? >> no, i don't. initially when congress was drafting the recovery act they put in place this boost in snap or food stamp allotments and it was never intended to affect a family by seeing a reduction from one month to the next but because of congressional interference today we are seeing a cliff so a family going in for grocery store today will see every snap household will see a reduction in their monthly benefits lower than what
charges against the firm. jeffrey brown takes a deeper look at the violations in question and what the case may suggest about the government's broader investigations into wall street practices. >> brown: steven cohen is not just any trader. he was one of the street's best known traders. and his firm was one of the more successful, with a record of returning 25% a year to investors. sheelah kolhatkar, a national correspondent at bloomberg businessweek has been chronicling this case and the world of hedge funds. she was at the press conference today and joins me now. both steve cohen were engaging in wrongdoing didn't have the evidence they needed. settlement of the charges against the company does not create any sort of immunity for cohen himself or any individuax3 and i think the u.s. attorney, he might have mentioned that four different times during a 40 minute press conference. so they are still looking into him. there is also a civil case with the sec which also could carry a significant bite. the sec is looking to bar stephen cohen from the securities industry for life. this is
. >> reporter: despite all of those concerns, mark brown is now working with oil and gas companies that are fracking in pennsylvania. brownstein says the environmental group isn't in favor of fracking but it is in favor of using more natural gas as an alternative to coal because gas is cleaner. a new report by the environmental protection agency says that u.s. power plants have recently cut their total greenhouse gas emissions by more than 6%. mostly because so many have switched from coal to gas. brownstein believes natural gas is the fossil fuel we should be using until we get our energy from renewable resources like wind and solar power. >> that's what we want but we also understand that it's going to take some time to get there. and the question is, what do you do in the meantime? >> so a little over two years ago the environmental defense fund started to talk to the companies fracking for gas in pennsylvania. the ones that so many other environmentalists see as the enemy. >> and in order to make change, you have to take the time to learn their industry, learn their concerns an
. >> the contributions were intended to help defeat governor brown's proposition 30 to raise taxes and pass the anti-labor measure proposition 32. they went to court before the november election pushing the group to disclose the true source of the contribution. she's now headed to washington d.c. to serve as president obama's appointee on the federal election commission. before thursday's settlement was announced, she spoke with scott shafer about the challenges of informing voters about the flood of money in today's political campaign. >> welcome to "newsroom." >> thank you very much. >> well, the fair political action commission, which you chair, or have chaired, was created after waterfwat. there was a lot of cynicism about politics. how do you feel you have made a difference under your tenure there to, you know, enhance trust or faith in our political system? >> the purpose of the ftpc was to enhance faith and trust. clearly a large percentage of americans do not feel that trust in government. we have made inroads, though, and i think we've provided much greater disclosure. we've shown the publi
don't have time to look at this little brown baby. >> and in this scenario i am assuming it is a little indian baby, if it is a white baby i would say that is disgusting, white babies are gross, i'm sorry. they are like regular babies that aren't ripe yet. >> rose: do you write all the time? do you co constantly wri? >> i do, at a certain point, you know, sometimes i would take a break from like writing the stand-up and then i realized that is dumb and i should just keep going because you get in a groove and, you know, even with this new special, i am kind of at the point where it is kind of close to being done and then i just hit like a new topic i really want to get into. i went to a friend's wedding and, you know, i talk about marriage and how scary it is and everything and i saw my friend's wedding and his vows and the girl's vows were unbelievable, so beautiful, like everyone in the audience was really moved, and i just heard it like, wow, if i felt that, i wouldn't be scared of marriage at all. and then i just started writing about that, and about divorce and, you
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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